Tag Archives: Form 8868

Form 990 Deadline Looms for Calendar-Year Organizations

For organizations that use the calendar year as its fiscal year, the deadline for filing your annual information return (on Form 990, or some variant of it) is fast approaching: May 16, 2016. Let’s look at some of the basics of annual information return reporting for 501(c)(3) organizations:

 Which version of Form 990 do I file?

There are three main variants for Form 990:

  • Form 990, for most organizations with gross receipts of $200,000 or more OR total assets of $500,000 or more;
  • Form 990-EZ, for most organizations with gross receipts of less than $200,000 AND total assets of less than $500,000;
  • Form 990-N (e-Postcard), for most organizations with gross receipts under $50,000.

Private foundations have their own 990, the 990-PF, and black lung trusts also have their own variant, the 990-BL.

Don’t forget that your filing may be more than just the form itself–you may have additional schedules to fill out as well. If you’re working on these forms, be careful; make sure you get all the schedules you need as well–and you may want to have a professional work on it anyway.

If you qualify for 990-N (e-Postcard) filing, there is no paper form; the form is submitted electronically through the IRS website. If you’ve filed a 990-N before, that’s a new thing–the IRS had accepted them through the Urban Institute, but that changed at the end of February 2016.

There are still some organizations that are exempt from filing Form 990, and the IRS has a list of those exceptions. If your organization is of a type on that list, make sure you review the list closely to ensure that you don’t have to file something else instead. For instance, the list includes stock bonus, pension, or profit-sharing trusts that qualify under section 401 of the Internal Revenue Code. However, that entry also indicates that those trusts should file Form 5500, so be careful to make sure you don’t have some other reporting requirement.

When do I have to file?

Form 990 is due by the 15th day of the 5th month following the close of your fiscal year. If your organization’s fiscal year is the calendar year, that usually means May 15 of the following year. This year, May 15, 2016 happens to fall on a Sunday, so the deadline falls on the following Monday, May 16. If you have a different fiscal year, you’ll need to calculate it from the end of your fiscal year.

What if I miss required filings?

If you don’t file for 3 consecutive years, the IRS will automatically revoke your organization’s tax-exempt status. If that happens, the organization will no longer be tax-exempt starting from the due date of the third missed return. If the organization was a 501(c)(3) organization prior to revocation, any contributions you receive after revocation will no longer be tax-deductible for your donors, which can be a very big mess.

If your organization is automatically revoked, it is significant work to have the tax-exempt status reinstated. If this happens, you have to file an application to have your organization’s tax-exempt status reinstated. Depending on the circumstances, this can be a lot of work–in one case, I had an organization that had to file a new 1023, 990-EZs for each of the missing years, and a statement explaining why the failures occurred and how the failures would be prevented in the future. Short version: make sure the return gets filed each year!

If your organization needs an extension, it can apply for one using Form 8868.

Remember, Form 990 is a public document, and it tells the public a lot about your finances. It should be completed carefully and accurately. However, it also gives you some opportunity to brag about the projects you’ve completed, so you really can use it as an opportunity to show off your organization’s work.

Note: a version of this post originally appeared on my firm’s website, attorneykevinkelly.com, and has been updated for publication here.

Photo credit: Mari Helin-Tuominen, via unsplash.com, licensed under CC0