Selecting Board Size: How Big Should The Board Be?

It’s one of those questions that sometimes seems to sneak up on new organizations (and sometimes troubles existing organizations too): how many people should we have on our board? Board size can affect your organization’s effectiveness, so we need to get it right.

Make Sure You Have the Minimum For Your State

Most states require 3 directors minimum, and most of the others require just 1. This number is a minimum; your organization is welcome to have more directors. In fact, it probably should have more directors; 3 people will have difficulty managing all but the smallest organizations.

There are no maximums; some boards have memberships over 20 and even into the 30s. I think that’s probably too many for most organizations.

Goldilocks and Board Size

Just like Goldilocks found the three bears’ beds were too hard, too soft, and just right (and was awfully picky, seeing as she let herself in), I think there’s too big, too small, and just right when you set up your board. Both the bare minimum size and the 20-30 member board are probably not the right choice for most organizations. Something in between those extremes, somewhere between 7 and 15, is probably best in most cases.

A board that’s too small can cause problems. The value of having numerous board members is that different board members have different perspectives. Board members with varying perspectives see problems and come up with solutions in different ways, and that’s not something you want to miss out on. Small boards make it more difficult for a quorum to be present, and can lead to more tied votes if you have an even number present.

Small boards may also have trouble staffing committees within the organization. Committees are not required, but they can help organizations address specific issues in the organization. Committees, whether permanent or temporary, often work on finances, fundraising, membership, and other issues.

Boards that are too large can quickly become unwieldy. When a proposed action comes up, board members may want to debate the matter, and if ever board member wants to speak on an issue, and you have a large board…well, your meetings could get really long, really fast. In such a large group, it’s also easier for board members to become disengaged with their duties, figuring someone else will bring up or deal with important topics.

Odds or Evens?

I usually advise organizations to have an odd number of members on the board. The obvious reason for this is to avoid ties. Of course, this is not a foolproof method of avoiding a tie; someone could abstain from a vote or not be able to attend a meeting. Still, I can’t see planning a situation to foster tied votes, like boards with even numbers of members.

What If I Have More People Interested in Serving Than I Have Board Positions?

First, be grateful to have so many people interested in leading your organization! Many organizations, especially in the startup phase, would love to have this problem.

Second, I don’t recommend expanding the board to add everyone that’s interested. People get burned out on board service, move away, have other things come up in their lives…and they may need some time away from board service. Also, your by-laws may require board members to take time off after a certain time on the board. In those cases, you could wind up with more positions than board members very quickly.

Instead, I suggest having those interested people serve in other capacities–committees, volunteers, that sort of thing. You want to keep them engaged in the organization. As you need new board members, you can start with these folks.

Board size is one of the first big decisions a new organization makes, and for most organizations, using Goldilocks as our guide–not too big, not too small, but just right–is what we want to strive for when it comes to board size.

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