Questions to Ask Prospective Board Members

Last time, we talked about what you should be asking an organization if you’re thinking of serving on their board. Today, we’re going to do the same thing for the other side. As this Forbes article says, you’re looking for 1) the ability to handle the job, 2) their interest in doing the job, and 3) whether they’ll fit in. So, with that in mind, what should you be asking prospective board members?

1. Are you excited about our mission?

An excited, engaged board is a valuable thing to have. I don’t mean to dismiss the value of skill and experience, but an enthusiastic board member can gain skills and experience, but a skilled, experienced board member that isn’t energized may not be contributing what they do have. Ideally, you can have all of those things, but if someone isn’t really that excited about the mission of the organization, you’re probably doing both prospective board members and the organization a favor by not putting him or her on the board.

2. What skills do you bring to the organization?

Ideally, you’ll want to have a variety of skills on the board: fundraising, planning, management, and governance, for instance. It’s probably too much to expect one person–or even a few people–to contribute all the skills you need. If you know you’re missing a particular skill, obviously you’ll want to bring someone on with the skills you need, if possible.

3. What have your previous board experiences been like?

You want to get a sense of not just the technical abilities of the candidate, but also a sense of how he or she works as part of a board. Do they generally work together with other board members? Do they handle conflict well? How’s their communication style? Are they willing to present a dissenting opinion, even if that opinion is theirs alone? Can they handle being on the “losing end” of an argument? You’ll want to consider whether the personality fit is right.

If you have prospective board members who have never served on a board before (which is fine–every board member who ever served had a first time), how do they work in other teams, maybe in their work or in some other organization?

4. Can you make the commitment we ask of our board members?

When I’ve worked with organizations, occasionally I have needed to find out what the expected time commitment for a board member is. I’ve found that sometimes the organization really doesn’t know! I suppose Question 3.5, then, is what sort of time commitment is necessary? Think about all the things a board member does:

  • Attending board meetings
  • Preparing for board meetings (and yes, board members should be preparing for board meetings)
  • Attending committee meetings
  • Preparing for committee meetings
  • Attending organization fundraisers and other events
  • Asking for contributions
  • In some cases, doing the work of the organization

And by all means, be upfront about the time involved! If you tell a prospective board member that it’s a 5 hour per month commitment, and it’s really 10, you haven’t done the candidate nor the organization any favors.

5. Can you handle the fundraising commitment?

Likewise, be upfront about the fundraising or contribution expectations. Some potential board members may not be as good at raising funds–are you willing to live with that in exchange for other abilities that person might have? Is it a skill that can be built?

6. What do you expect of the organization?

This is another opportunity to gauge how well the candidate will fit into your organization. There aren’t any right answers here–but what does this person expect match up with what the experience is likely to be? Also, I’d be a little leery of someone who doesn’t have any expectations. If you get that answer, I’d press a little before moving on–after all, we want to assess fit, and that’s good for the candidate and the organization both.

7. What do you think makes for an effective board member?

I start from the assumption that everyone wants to do a good job (and in my experience, this is usually, but not always, the case). Assuming that’s the case, the answer to this question can give you a look into the standards that the candidate holds himself or herself to. Additionally, it can provide you with some insight into the standards the prospective board member will hold his or her fellow board members to, which can help you assess fit.

8. Why are you interested in board service?

There are a bunch of other ways to get involved in the community: you could join a service organization, you could do other types of volunteer work, or you could simply donate to various causes. What is it about board service specifically that’s interesting to them? This can help you determine what motivates them and how they see their skills.

9. Is it important to you to interact socially with your fellow board members?

This is not a question that had occurred to me; however, I noticed it in some other possible lists of questions (see here and here for examples, as well as some suggested questions I didn’t cover). For some people, joining a board is a social experience, and they expect to interact socially with their fellow board members. At the other end of the spectrum are people who don’t see board service as a social outlet (this is where I’m at, not that I mind social interaction). Again, this is an issue of fit: someone who wants social interaction might not enjoy a “do the work and go home” kind of board–and the opposite is probably true as well.

10. What questions do you have for the organization?

A potential board member ought to have some questions (maybe even some of the ones we talked about last time) for the organization. If prospective board members have no questions, and they haven’t already been doing something in the organization, I’d suspect that they weren’t interested or weren’t taking the commitment very seriously.

Ultimately, you want to figure out if prospective board members can bring the skills or connections you need, the enthusiasm for doing the board’s work, and a personality that will fit into your board. If someone isn’t a good fit, there’s no need to force it; trying to make someone fit will probably be bad for that person and your organization.

Photo credit: Bench Accounting, via unsplash.com, licensed under CC0

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